u̯er-2 (*su̯er-)


u̯er-2 (*su̯er-)
    u̯er-2 (*su̯er-)
    English meaning: highland, high place, top, high
    Deutsche Übersetzung: “erhöhte Stelle (in Gelände or in der Haut)”
    Note: extended u̯er-d-, u̯er-s-
    Material: A. Lat. varus “Gesichtsausschlag, Knöspchen” (= Lith. vìras, pl. viraĩ, compare E.Lith. virỹs, pl. viriaĩ m. “Finne in Schweinefleisch”), Lat. varulus “Gerstenkorn in eye”, varix m. f. “Krampfader”; perhaps M.Ir. ferbb f. “Hitzblatter, Finne” (*u̯erbhü), from which borrowed O.Bret. guerp “Brandmal”, M.Bret. guerbl “bubon”; Mod.Ice. var n. “Augenschleim”, Swe. var n. “pus”; compare O.H.G. warah, O.E. wearh, worsm ds.; O.E. wer-nægl m. “ulcer”, nEng. warnel ds.; Dutch weer “weal, callus”, Nor. dial. vere ‘swelling, lump, growth under the skin the Kũhe”; with n-suffix: Swe. dial. verna, O.H.G. werna “Krampfader”, Ger. dial. Wern “Gerstenkorn in eye” (*wernō); with the meaning “lip” (*swollen elevation): Goth. wairilom dat. pl., O.E. weleras pl. (rearrangement from *werelas), O.Fris. were, as from the s-extension O.Ice. vǫrr f. O.Pruss. warsus “lip”. u̯er-d-: Pers. balū “ wart “ (Iran. *vard-); O.H.G. warza, O.E. wearte, O.Ice. varta f. (*u̯ordü) “ wart “; ablaut. O.C.S. vrědъ “damage”, Russ. vered “ulcer, Eiterbeule”. u̯er-s-: Lat. verrūca “ a steep place, height, a wart on the human body, an excrescence on precious stones “ (by Cato also “locus editus et asper”), O.E. wearr “weal, callus, wart “, Flem. warre “weal, callus, knag”, O.H.G. werra “Krampfader”, Ger. Werre “Gerstenkorn in eye”. B. O.Ind. varṣmán- m. “height, headmost, topmost, highest, uppermost “, várṣman- n. “height, headmost, topmost, highest, uppermost, cusp, peak” = Gk. ἕρμα n. “pad, Riff, hill” (? after Frisk 561 ff. identical with ἕρμα n. “Ballast” and from IE *su̯er-mn̥ ‘schweres Gewicht”), O.Ind. várṣīyas- “higher”, várṣiṣṭha- “höchst”; Lith. viršù s “das Obere, höchste cusp, peak”, Ltv. vìrsus m. “das Obere”, f. vìrsa; Slav. *vьrchъ in O.C.S. vrьchъ, Russ. verch “ headmost, topmost, highest, uppermost, acme, apex “ (O.C.S. vrъchu “above”, of ustem); O.Ir. ferr “better” (*u̯erso- “ upper “) to Positiv fern “good” (*u̯er-no-); Welsh etc. gwell “better” either from *u̯el-no- “Wahl” or after Thurneysen Gk. 236 ferr and gwell from *u̯er-lowith different development from -rl-; M.Ir. farr f. “Pfosten” = Welsh gwar f. “ nape “ (*u̯r̥sü); manche connect Goth. waírsiza, O.H.G. wirsiro ‘schlimmer” with Ir. ferr, so that (as by Ger. about S. 1105) “in höherem Grade” to “about dasrechte Maß hinausgehend”; doubtful Gk. ῥίον “Berghöhe, foreland, promontory “ (*u̯rison?) and O.Ice. risi, O.H.G. riso, M.L.G. rese “ giant “ (*wrisan-), O.S. wrisil ds., wrisilīc “riesenhaft” (die forms ohnew through support in Gmc. risan above S. 331); perhaps also Thrac.-Phryg. βρία “fortress” (*u̯rii̯ü) and Toch. AB ri “town, city” (whether not to u̯er- “umschließen”); doubtful Phryg. ὅρου “ἄνω”; after Specht (KZ 66, 199 ff.) here also Gk. οὐρανός, Lesb. ὤρανος (more properly ὀρρ-), ὄρανος, böot. Dor. lak. ὠρανός m. ‘sky, heaven” from *u̯orsanos, to *u̯orsos “high” (in O.Ind. várṣīyas- “higher”, see above), further ablaut. Gk. ῎Ερρος ὁ Ζεύς (Hes).
    References: WP. I 266 f., WH. II 734, 762 f., Trautmann 360, 362, Vasmer 1, 190 f., 230.

Proto-Indo-European etymological dictionary. 2015.